Test Track Js Client Save

The JavaScript client for TestTrack

Project README

TestTrack JS Client

Build Status

This is the JavaScript client library for the TestTrack system.

It provides client-side split-testing and feature-toggling through a simple, mostly declarative API.

This library intends to obscure the details of assignment and visitor session management, allowing you to focus entirely on the experience a visitor should have when she has been assigned a variant.

If you're looking to do server-side assignment and you're using Rails, then check out our Rails client.

Installation

You can add the test track js client to your application via npm or yarn.

npm install test_track_js_client --save
yarn add test_track_js_client

You can find the latest version of the test track JS client here.

The test track JS client currently has the following dependencies: blueimp-md5, uuid, axios and js-cookie.

The client is distributed with two artifacts:

  • testTrack.js is an ES6 module with no bundled dependencies.
  • testTrack.bundle.js is a UMD-style module, bundled with blueimp-md5, uuid, axios, and js-cookie.

If you're using a fancy build pipeline (grunt, gulp, webpack), then you are all set. If not, you have a few other options for loading the client into your page.

Note: test track JS client makes use of bind, so you may need a polyfill to support older browsers.

Configuration

Before using the client you must call TestTrack.initialize(). This method also takes some optional configuration parameters, if you fancy.

API

.vary(split_name, options)

The vary method is used to perform a split. It takes 2 arguments.

  • split_name -- The first argument is the name of the split. This will be a snake_case string, e.g. "homepage_redesign_q1_2015".

  • options -- The second argument is an object that contains the context of the assignment, a variant/callback configuration (variants), and a default variant (defaultVariant).

    • context -- is a string that the developer provides so that the test track server can record where an assignment was first created. If a call to vary is made in more than one place for a given split, you'll be able to see which codepath was hit first.

    • variants -- The variant/callback configuration is an object whose keys are the variant names and whose values are function handlers for each of those variants.

    • defaultVariant -- The default variant is used if the user is assigned to a variant that is not represented in the variants object. When this happens, Test Track will execute the handler of the default variant and re-assign the user to the default variant. You should not rely on this defaulting behavior, it is merely provided to ensure we don't break the customer experience. You should instead make sure that you represent all variants of the split in your variants and if variants are added to the split on the backend, update your code to reflect the new variants. Because this defaulting behavior re-assigns the user to the defaultVariant, no data will be recorded for the variant that is not represented. This will impede our ability to collect meaningful data for the split.

Here is an example of a 4-way split where 'variant_4' is the default variant. Let's say 'variant_5' was added to this split on the backend but this code did not change to reflect that new variant. Any users that Test Track assigns to 'variant_5' will be re-assigned to 'variant_4'.

TestTrack.vary('name_of_split', {
  context: 'homepage',
  variants: {
    variant_1: function() {
      // do variant 1 stuff
    },
    variant_2: function() {
      // do variant 2 stuff
    },
    variant_3: function() {
      // do variant 3 stuff
    },
    variant_4: function() {
      // do variant 4 stuff
    }
  },
  defaultVariant: 'variant_4' // default to variant_4 (this is required)
});

.ab(split_name, options)

The ab method is used exclusively for two-way splits and feature toggles. It takes 2 arguments.

  • split_name -- The first argument is the name of the split. This will be a snake_case string, e.g. "homepage_chat_bubble".

  • options -- The second argument is an object that contains the context, an optional trueVariant, and a callback function.

    • context -- is a string that the developer provides so that the test track server can record where an assignment was first created. If a call to vary is made in more than one place for a given split, you'll be able to see which codepath was hit first.
    • trueVariant -- an optional parameter that specifies which variant is the "true" variant and the other variant will be used as the default. Without the true variant, ab will assume that the variants for the split are named 'true' and 'false'.
    • callback -- a single function that will be called for all variants. If the trueVariant is assigned to the visitor then true will be passed to the callback.
    TestTrack.ab('name_of_split', {
      context: 'homepage',
      trueVariant: 'variant_name',
      callback: function(hasVariantName) {
        if (hasVariantName) {
          // do something
        } else {
          // do something else
        }
      }
    });
    
    TestTrack.ab('some_new_feature', {
      context: 'homepage',
      callback: function(hasFeature) {
        if (hasFeature) {
          // do something
        }
      }
    });
    

.logIn(identifier, value)

The logIn method is used to ensure a consistent experience across devices. For instance, when a user logs in to your app on a new device, you should also log the user into Test Track in order to grab their existing split assignments instead of treating them like a new visitor. It takes 2 arguments.

  • identifier -- The first argument is the name of the identifier. This will be a snake_case string, e.g. "myapp_user_id".
  • value -- The second argument is a primitive value, e.g. 12345, "abcd"
TestTrack.logIn('myapp_user_id', 12345).then(function() {
  // From this point on you have existing split assignments from a previous device.
});

Advanced Configuration

When you call TestTrack.initialize() you can optionally pass in an analytics object, an error logger, and a callback that will run after the test track visitor has loaded, but before any analytics events have fired. For example:

TestTrack.initialize({
  analytics: {
    trackAssignment: function(visitorId, assignment, callback) {
      var props = {
        SplitName: assignment.getSplitName(),
        SplitVariant: assignment.getVariant(),
        SplitContext: assignment.getContext()
      };

      remoteAnalyticsService.track('SplitAssigned', props, callback);
    },
    identify: function(visitorId) {
      remoteAnalyticsService.identify(visitorId);
    },
    alias: function(visitorId) {
      remoteAnalyticsService.alias(visitorId);
    }
  },
  errorLogger: function(message) {
    RemoteLoggingService.log(message); // logs remotely so that you can be alerted to any misconfigured splits
  },
  onVisitorLoaded: function(visitor) {
    // callback that will run after the test track visitor has loaded, but before any analytics events have fired
  }
});

Alternative Setup

This is only if you're not using a build pipeline

Simple HTML setup

You can load the bundled and minified version of the client that includes all of the dependencies for you, like this:

<script type="text/javascript" src="path/to/deps/test_track_js_client/dist/testTrack.bundle.js"></script>

RequireJS setup

You can require the test track client anywhere you need it in classic requirejs style:

var TestTrack = require('path/to/deps/test_track_js_client/dist/testTrack');

OR

define(['path/to/deps/test_track_js_client/dist/testTrack'], function(TestTrack) {});

How to Contribute

We would love for you to contribute! Anything that benefits the majority of test_track users—from a documentation fix to an entirely new feature—is encouraged.

Before diving in, check our issue tracker and consider creating a new issue to get early feedback on your proposed change.

Suggested Workflow

  1. Fork the project and create a new branch for your contribution.
  2. Write your contribution (and any applicable test coverage).
  3. Make sure all tests pass.
  4. Submit a pull request.

Running tests

  1. run yarn install to download dependencies
  2. run yarn test to run the tests
  3. run yarn build to build the distributables
Open Source Agenda is not affiliated with "Test Track Js Client" Project. README Source: Betterment/test_track_js_client
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